I meant to post these last weekend, but forgot. I drew them last month, using the Bodies in Motion site, beginning with 30 second poses and gradually giving myself more time. The site is excellent for capturing poses that a model would never be able to hold.

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I keep mentioning on this blog that I want to do more drawing from life, so when the stable I’ve begun riding at advertised an informal show jumping event I went along to sketch the participants. At the beginning it was hard to put more than a couple of lines down, but after a while I relaxed and sped up and managed to capture more detail.

One thing that was great fun to draw (though not so good for those riding) were the refusals and run outs. I felt I was able to create drawings covering a huge range of personalities and action.

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Yesterday I sketched Elsa as she chewed on a toy. Occasionally she’d bring it over to me and dump it at my feet before retreating across the room to stare at me. She usually wore an accusing look at this point – “What, you haven’t thrown it yet?”

I’m a bit unsure about my painting below; it’s quite wonky but it was fun to play with colour. Usually I stick to sketches, but the Sketch app on the iPad Pro is amazingly versatile and I’m looking forward to trying more painting on the go.

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I thought I’d push my gesture skills a bit and try drawing from moving figures, so I pulled up some ballet videos on YouTube. Very difficult, but good fun!Ballet_01

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These drawings are from earlier this month. Another excellent model! I struggled after the break – most of the drawings below are from the first half.

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Haven’t drawn much in the last few days, so I spent some of my morning doing timed sketches from artists.pixelovely.com – a great site for gesture practice. These were 30 second drawings.

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I haven’t posted any figure drawings in ages. They’ve been building up for a while so here are some of my gesture drawings from a fantastic workshop that Sarah Airriess (former Disney animator, animation assistant on Duet, and animator on Ethel and Ernest) gave during the Animation Base Camp back in August.

We began with two-minute poses and worked within shorter and shorter amounts of time until we were using our wrong hands for ten-second poses … the sketches below are in approximate order, so you can see the progression (or degeneration) of the drawings. There were many, many more – one of the great things about gesture drawing is the sheer output. This is a selection of the few I could bear to look at …

I had a wonderful time. It’s been too long since I’ve spent so much time doing real-life gestures!

If you haven’t seen my previous storyboards from the Animation Base Camp, you may want to start here.

The story revolves around odd-couple animals at a therapist’s office. Throughout the camp I worked on several different versions of a scene involving a shark.

Here’s my first, rough, pass:

A cleaned up version with a different take:

The final version, from the animatic:

In the final version the shark became female, the length of the scene was condensed considerably, and a lot of the humour came from the audio rather than the visuals. (Imagine the shark’s line read in a strong Glaswegian accent.) Given the overall pacing of the story it was the right way to go, but I missed the fun I had drawing the therapist’s reactions.

During the Animation Base Camp we had opportunities to come up with additional gags which were, in some cases, added to the story. Here are some of my shark ones:

See another board from the Base Camp here!

I had the privilege of taking part in the first-ever Animation Base Camp, a trainee programme in Glasgow with mentors from Sony Pictures Animation, during July to September this year. It focused on creating visual development art and an animatic for an original idea directed by David Feiss. I worked as a storyboard artist, creating ideas and gags for the project.

You can find out a little more about who was involved at the link above, but I’d like to particularly thank Fraser, Elaine and Will, as well as Jenn, and of course all my fellow students.

The story revolves around odd-couple animals at a therapist’s office. This is one of my scenes from the final animatic, featuring a talkative bear.

We also had the opportunity to develop lots of gag ideas of how some of the couples might have met. This was one of my ideas:

See more storyboards from the Base Camp here and here.

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